Welcome!

December 11, 2009

Welcome to my Public History project concerning the amount of Chinese history taught in the American public school system, specifically looking at public high school framework in Massachusetts. For more information about this project, please check out the ABOUT section above!

While I have submitted this project for my course, it is still a work in progress. Coming soon I hope to interview some history school teachers at the school I graduated from and see what areas of Chinese history they personally feel is important to teach, and also what their textbooks/sources include about Chinese history. And, I may even try and write my own framework outline for what I feel should be studied to be included in the MA curriculum.


Question #10

December 11, 2009

Based on your total education and experiences, how would you rate your overall knowledge of Chinese history and culture?

Analysis: As this shows, nearly 80% say they have average or lower knowledge of Chinese history and culture, showing that perhaps a poor background of Chinese history in the US school system is what does lead to ignorance and stereotypes.


Question #9

December 11, 2009

Question: Why do you believe it is or isn’t important to have more Chinese history introduced to high school students?

Because of the limitations of the survey website, the answers to this question were compiled as images. To view the results, please click the link below which will take you to a Google Documents presentation featuring the responses: Question #9 Results


Analysis: This question had many different responses that ranged from all ends of the spectrum, from there shouldn’t be any special emphasis on Chinese history to a need to have whole courses dedicated to the subject. Here are some themes that stood out:

– desire by many wishing to have known more
– some felt Chinese history is more suited for a college setting
– the US shows a bias in what type of history is taught
– need of more cultural requirements to gain a high school diploma
– more Chinese history would promote tolerance, lead to less racism and stereotyping of Chinese Americans, and would end ignorance
– perhaps Chinese history should not be required and forced upon students, but it should definitly be offered to those who want it
– a need to strengthen the amount and quality of US history taught first, and then worry about other cultures and countries
– at least focus more strongly on current US/China relations


Question #8

December 11, 2009

Do you believe it is important to have more Chinese history introduced to high school students?

Analysis: There is clearly a strong opinion showcased that there needs to be more emphasis on Chinese history being taught.


Question #7

December 11, 2009

Question: Can you recall any of the themes, people, or facts that were taught in the high school world history course?

Because of the limitations of the survey website, the answers to this question were compiled as images. To view the results, please click the link below which will take you to a Google Documents presentation featuring the responses: Question #7 Results


Analysis: Some of the most common responses:

– the Silk Road
– Mao Zedong and Tiananmen Square 1989
– European influences in China
– relating to US history (immigration, Exclusion Act, World War II, Vietnam War)

One person said that they had had a teacher who had experience in Chinese history and had been to China, and therefore recalled learning a great deal of Chinese history and culture. Also, many surveyed did not seem confident in their answers and admitted to a lack of memory of what they really learned, proving it must not have been taught very in depth (or that there is a strong lack of interest in the subject matter).


Question #6

December 11, 2009

To what degree was Chinese history covered in this world history course?

Analysis: As this shows, only 20% of those surveyed had whole units in their world history course devoted to Chinese history, while 70% only learned facts as it was useful to other themes and units based on western and American history.


Question #5

December 11, 2009

In high school, did you take a world history course?


Analysis: As this shows, 90% of those surveyed took a world history course in high school, and is not surprising as in Massachusetts it is a requirement in order to graduate.